Samoisitis

What is Sesamoiditis?

Sesamoiditis is an inflammation of the accessory bones situated on the underside of the foot and the big toe. The Bones in the body are connected to each other at joints. But sesamoid bones are connected to tendons in the muscle. The patella is the largest sesamoid. Foot has two small sesamoids on the underside of the front of the foot near toe.

Sesamoiditis in the foot may be caused by excessive exercise, such as running and also by jumping such as basketball and volleyball. Sesamoiditis is a common ailment that affects the forefoot, typically in young people who engage in physical activity like running or dancing. Its most common symptom is pain in the ball-of-the-foot, especially on the medial or inner side.

Sesamoiditis generally appears as a gradual onset of pain. The pain usually begins as a mild ache. It may build to an intense throbbing. One of the major causes of sesamoiditis is increased activity. Speedwork, hill work, or even increased mileage can cause this. If you have a bony foot, you simply may not have enough fat on your foot to protect your tender sesamoids. Also, if you have a high arched foot, you will naturally run on the balls-of-your-feet, adding even more pressure.

Symptoms of Sesamoiditis?

The most obvious symptom is pain in the general area of the sesamoids. This may be mild, intermittent, and dull, like a bruise made by a stone in the shoe, or it may be severe and throbbing. The pain may be so great as to stop the injured person from walking altogether

What Causes Sesamoiditis?

Sesamoiditis can be distinguished from other forefoot conditions by its gradual onset. The pain usually begins as a mild ache and increases gradually as the aggravating activity is continued. It may build to an intense throbbing. In most cases there is little or no bruising or redness. One of the major causes of sesamoiditis is increased activity. You have probably stepped up your activity level lately, which has forced you to put more pressure on the balls of your feet. Speedwork or even increased mileage can cause this. If you have a bony foot, you simply may not have enough fat on your foot to protect your tender sesamoids. Also, if you have a high arched foot, you will naturally run on the balls of the feet, adding even more pressure.

Sesamoiditis Treatment options:

Treatment options for sesamoiditis include:

  • Rest
  • Anti-inflammatory medications
  • Protective padding
  • Shoe inserts and modifications
  • A short leg cast
  • Cortisone injections
  • Ibuprofen to decrease pain and swelling

The treatment of sesamoiditis should be individualized. The most important first steps in the treatment of sesamoiditis are to reduce aggravating activities and to wear comfortable shoes. Further treatment may include icing to decrease pain around the sesamoid bones, stretching and strengthening exercises, shoe orthotics or medications. Complete rest with a removable cast or a cortisone injection may be required to reduce inflammation and pain. Surgery is rarely necessary for sesamoiditis